A Student of History

June 4, 2008

Abuses in Canada

Filed under: Canada,PC — John Maass @ 5:32 am

Some of the most dangerous and oppressive institutions in existence on this side of the Atlantic are the various Canadian “human rights tribunals,” which take PC so far to the left that they impose onerous restrictions on morality, speech, and individual liberties.  For example:

A Saskatchewan human rights tribunal has fined Regina marriage commissioner Orville Nichols $2,500 for refusing to “marry” two homosexual men who approached him for the ceremony in 2005.

Mr. Nichols told the two men, identified only as “M.J.” and his partner as “B.R.” in the court documents, he would not marry them because it went against his religious convictions as a devout Baptist, but referred them to another commissioner, Edna McCall, because he was aware that she would perform same sex marriages.

The court documents reveal that the complainant M.J. was 51 years old at the time of the hearing last year, had been married for about seventeen years and had three children, and “did not realize that he was a homosexual until after he was divorced.”

The “marriage” was performed on May 5, 2005, on the dock on the east side of Wascana Lake, as M.J. and B.R. had originally planned.

The tribunal ruling stated that Mr. Nichols had contravened section 31.4(b) of the Saskatchewan Human Rights Code and that his refusal based on religious belief conflicted with his duties as a public officer. “The Commission stands by its position that to allow public officials to insert their personal morality when determining who should and who should not receive the benefit of law undermines human rights in Saskatchewan beyond the issue of same-sex marriages.”

Are things headed the same way in the USA?  I doubt it, but I will continue to chronicle the abuses of these absurd bodies, of which Canada should be ashamed.  Check out some more stories here.

For a similar story about France, click here.  It describes how a French actress, Brigette Bardot, was fined about $23,000 for stating an opinion.

About these ads

Leave a Comment »

No comments yet.

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

The Rubric Theme Blog at WordPress.com.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 28 other followers

%d bloggers like this: