A Student of History

March 5, 2006

George Washington’s Rules of Civility

Filed under: Uncategorized — John Maass @ 5:50 pm

Although this is a few years old now, there’s a bit of information here on George Washington’s Rules of Civility, from the NPR website. “As a young schoolboy in Virginia, George Washington took his first steps toward greatness by copying out by hand a list of 110 ‘Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation.’ Based on a 16th-century set of precepts compiled for young gentlemen by Jesuit instructors, the Rules of Civility were one of the earliest and most powerful forces to shape America’s first president.”

I like #87: “Let your carriage be such as becomes a man grave, settled and attentive to that which is spoken. Contradict not at every turn what others say.”

And #25: “Superfluous Complements and all Affectation of Ceremony are to be avoided, yet where due they are not to be Neglected.”

One may buy a copy here.   

 

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