A Student of History

November 5, 2007

Thomas Stone National Historic Site

Filed under: Early America,Historic Preservation — John Maass @ 7:50 am

On Saturday, I took my kids to a lovely and I must say unheralded NPS site in Southern Maryland’s Charles County, the Thomas Stone National Historic Site, near Port Tobacco.  Even though its not far from DC, by the time you drive south of the city, you are in the country to be sure.  The house, much of which has been reconstructed after a fire in 1977, is very nice, even if sparsely furnished, and they have some good walking trails too.

The Stone family lived at Haberdeventure (the plantation’s name) from 1770 until 1936, a total of six generations.When a fire destroyed much of the main house in 1977, the house had been continuously occupied for over 200 years.  The park opened to the public in 1997 after an extensive restoration project was completed.

Unfortunately, the state of Maryland has some asinine rule that prevents the site from posting signage on MD 210 (Indian Head Highway) so if you are not good with maps, use US 301.

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2 Comments »

  1. Wow – I didn’t know about any signage law on 210 but now that you mention it I have never seen any (historical signs) on that road. I’ve been to the site but not actually yet visited the house. What a sin since I live right in the area!
    Thanks for posting!

    Comment by Richard — November 5, 2007 @ 10:02 am | Reply

  2. The NPS ranger at the site told me that Maryland says they have enough signage on US 301, and they can not place more on MD Rt. 210. Government at its finest!!

    Comment by John Maass — November 14, 2007 @ 1:53 pm | Reply


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